History and Role of the Primacy - from the Anglican Journal

‘A mirror for the life of our church’: The history and role of the primacy

BY MATT GARDNER AND JOELLE KIDD - February 20, 2019

The primatial cross is the only official symbol of the primate of the Anglican Church of Canada. It was first presented to General Synod in 1937 after the submission of numerous designs. The cross is made of silver gilt and features the arms of General Synod and of the four original dioceses of the Canadian church. Photo: Saskia Rowley

The primatial cross is the only official symbol of the primate of the Anglican Church of Canada. It was first presented to General Synod in 1937 after the submission of numerous designs. The cross is made of silver gilt and features the arms of General Synod and of the four original dioceses of the Canadian church. Photo: Saskia Rowley

When delegates meet in Vancouver this July for the 42nd General Synod of the Anglican Church of Canada, they will vote for a new primate to succeed Archbishop Fred Hiltz. But what does being primate of the Anglican Church of Canada really entail?

The primacy has evolved throughout the history of the church. In 1893, the church’s first primate was a diocesan bishop chosen from among the metropolitans, whose only specific duties were to serve as president of General Synod and of the House of Bishops.

Since that time, the office of primate has steadily grown to encompass a national episcopal ministry, in which the primate serves as a figure of unity and a reflection of the diversity, challenges and ministries of the church.

CLICK HERE TO READ THE WHOLE ARTICLE - IT IS INTERESTING